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Felix 2020

February 13 - 16, 2020
Hollywood Roosevelt, Los Angeles 
Tower Room 1102

Featured Works

Wangari Mathenge

Wangari Mathenge
The Apothecaries, 2019
Oil on canvas
20 x 16 in (50.8 x 40.6 cm)

For The Apothecaries, Kenyan artist Wangari Mathenge draws inspiration from “The Danger of a Single Story,” a 2009 Ted Talk delivered by the author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. In this vein, Mathenge takes as her subject complex human beings and situations, focusing her attention on those liminal moments that are rarely distinguished or registered but are essential to the narration of an unabridged existence.

Betye Saar

Betye Saar
Comet, 1987
Sequins hand-applied on cloth
24.5 x 13 in (62.2 x 33.0 cm)

Betye Saar (b.1926) is one of the most important artists of her generation, playing a seminal role in the development of Assemblage art. Since the 1960s, her work has reflected on African American identity, spirituality and the connectedness between different cultures. Created by Saar and fabricated in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, the bead and sequin works were first exhibited at “Betye Saar: Resurrection: Site Installations 1977 to 1987" at California State University, Fullerton, CA (February 6 - March 6, 1988).

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Otis Kwame Kye Quaicoe

Otis Kwame Kye Quaicoe
Portrait of Nyawal Tut, 2019
Oil on canvas
48 x 36 in (121.9 x 91.4 cm)

Otis Quaicoe’s figuration is also built upon a color palette where color becomes its own language of transformation, be it social, political or personal. These are images of empowerment and redemption, sophistication and humility, curiosity and quietude. Each figure becomes a symbol of the reclamation of cultural dignity, embracing the idea of origin and personal narrative as it relates to gender and race dynamics.

Amoako Boafo

Amoako Boafo
Seye, 2019
Oil on canvas
36 x 48 in (91.4 x 121.9 cm)

Portraying individuals from the Diaspora and the continent by highlighting self-perception and beauty, Amoako Boafo invites a reflection on Black subjectivity, specifically of its diversity and complexity. His portraits are notable for their bold colors and patterns, which celebrate his subjects, in an attempt to challenge representation that objectifies and dehumanizes Blackness.

Ardeshir Tabrizi

Ardeshir Tabrizi
Caspian Aura, 2020
Graphite and gouache on printed paper mounted to canvas
43 x 35 in (109.2 x 88.9 cm)

Iranian American artist Ardeshir Tabrizi’s hand-embroidered textile pieces address the intersection of cultural renewal and historical understanding of heritage in contemporary society. This new body of work is a personal journey in search of the artist’s own nationalistic identity, while understanding the role of these physical places in the cultural, geographic and political landscape of today. Taking inspiration from oral history, mythology, literature, and his family’s travels, Tabrizi’s work resonates with his own personal discovery and reconnection with the changing social landscape of Iran at home in Los Angeles.

Betye Saar

Betye Saar
The Lore of Mami Wata, 2009
Mixed media assemblage
16 x 13.25 x 10.25 in (40.6 x 33.7 x 26.0 cm)

For nearly 70 years, Betye Saar has created prints, collages, and assemblages that transform the cast-off and forgotten into powerful explorations of African American history and identity, the politics of race and gender, spirituality, and the occult. To visit her Los Angeles studio is to enter the world of a brilliant collector. Carefully categorized and filed, everything has its place. Black memorabilia, African sculptures, washboards, cages, scales, buttons, and myriad knick-knacks await assemblages in progress. This is a home to things cast off and forgotten, things waiting to be activated. Whether washboards, buttons, masks, or cages, Saar chooses things based on their formal possibilities as well as on their alchemical, metaphysical, and transformative potential. Her travels and the experience of being an African American woman in Los Angeles have had an important influence on the kinds of objects that attract her and the kinds of art historical research she has done. -Steven Nelson, 2018.

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Ardeshir Tabrizi

Ardeshir Tabrizi
Immortals, 2019
Embroidery thread, gouache and graphite on printed paper
26 x 19 in (66.0 x 48.3 cm)

Iranian American artist Ardeshir Tabrizi’s hand-embroidered textile pieces address the intersection of cultural renewal and historical understanding of heritage in contemporary society. This new body of work is a personal journey in search of the artist’s own nationalistic identity, while understanding the role of these physical places in the cultural, geographic and political landscape of today. Taking inspiration from oral history, mythology, literature, and his family’s travels, Tabrizi’s work resonates with his own personal discovery and reconnection with the changing social landscape of Iran at home in Los Angeles.

Betye Saar

Betye Saar
Two Dice, 1986
Sequins hand-applied on cloth
12 x 19 in (30.5 x 48.3 cm)

Betye Saar (b.1926) is one of the most important artists of her generation, playing a seminal role in the development of Assemblage art. Since the 1960s, her work has reflected on African American identity, spirituality and the connectedness between different cultures. Created by Saar and fabricated in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, the bead and sequin works were first exhibited at “Betye Saar: Resurrection: Site Installations 1977 to 1987" at California State University, Fullerton, CA (February 6 - March 6, 1988).

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Evan Nesbit

Evan Nesbit 
Sock Puppet, 2020
Acrylic dye on burlap; in artist frame 
16 x 20 in (40.64 x 50.80 cm)

Evan Nesbit’s paintings expand his process of rendering space and depth through illusionistic visual cues, forming works inserted between the boundaries of experience and reality. Nesbit uses pattern, color and material relationships to challenge the pictorial space of painting's modes of perception; here, painting is an attempt through material and process to capture space and light in estranged recognition. 

Lenz Geerk

Lenz Geerk
A Night, 2020
Acrylic on canvas
15.75 x 11.81 in (40 x 30 cm)

Known for his surreal paintings of soft figures caught in moments of contemplation, the Düsseldorf-based Lenz Geerk presents mysterious paintings of people in action. Through the color, line and focus of these works, Geerk creates psychologically charged paintings that are removed from a specific time or place, yet of this hour. The nearly monochromatic palettes, only occasionally warmed by other colors, add an aura of heightened emotional tension. These paintings capture and reveal the usually concealed human psyche through atmosphere and body language.

Zhao Zhao

Zhao Zhao
Control 3, 2019
Natural marble
10.24 x 4.84 x 4.84 in (26.0 x 12.3 x 12.3 cm)

Zhao Zhao’s work is often associated with anti-authoritarian or non-conformist tendencies, renowned for confronting existing ideological structures and exercising the power of individual free will in his work.  Zhao works in various mediums, including but not limited to video, photography, performance, and installations incorporating found objects; this refusal of material limitations demonstrates his reflexive intensification of a dialogue with and within the medium. As Chinese culture and society go through drastic transformations in the contemporary era, the usages and metaphorical meanings of the gourd have changed towards a new reality.

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Betye Saar

Betye Saar
Snake in the Heart, 1987
Sequins hand-applied on cloth
27 x 14.5 in (68.6 x 36.8 cm)

Betye Saar (b.1926) is one of the most important artists of her generation, playing a seminal role in the development of Assemblage art. Since the 1960s, her work has reflected on African American identity, spirituality and the connectedness between different cultures. Created by Saar and fabricated in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, the bead and sequin works were first exhibited at “Betye Saar: Resurrection: Site Installations 1977 to 1987" at California State University, Fullerton, CA (February 6 - March 6, 1988).

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Ardeshir Tabrizi

Ardeshir Tabrizi
Shahanshah, 2019
Embroidery thread, gouache and graphite on printed paper
26 x 19 in (66.0 x 48.3 cm)

Iranian American artist Ardeshir Tabrizi’s hand-embroidered textile pieces address the intersection of cultural renewal and historical understanding of heritage in contemporary society. This new body of work is a personal journey in search of the artist’s own nationalistic identity, while understanding the role of these physical places in the cultural, geographic and political landscape of today. Taking inspiration from oral history, mythology, literature, and his family’s travels, Tabrizi’s work resonates with his own personal discovery and reconnection with the changing social landscape of Iran at home in Los Angeles.

Betye Saar

Betye Saar
Fish Thru Fan, 1986
Sequins hand-applied on cloth
19 x 18 in (48.3 x 45.7 cm)

Betye Saar (b.1926) is one of the most important artists of her generation, playing a seminal role in the development of Assemblage art. Since the 1960s, her work has reflected on African American identity, spirituality and the connectedness between different cultures. Created by Saar and fabricated in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, the bead and sequin works were first exhibited at “Betye Saar: Resurrection: Site Installations 1977 to 1987" at California State University, Fullerton, CA (February 6 - March 6, 1988).

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Zhao Zhao

Zhao Zhao
Control 5, 2019
Natural marble
7.87 x 4.84 x 4.84 in (20.0 x 12.3 x 12.3 cm)

Zhao Zhao’s work is often associated with anti-authoritarian or non-conformist tendencies, renowned for confronting existing ideological structures and exercising the power of individual free will in his work.  Zhao works in various mediums, including but not limited to video, photography, performance, and installations incorporating found objects; this refusal of material limitations demonstrates his reflexive intensification of a dialogue with and within the medium. As Chinese culture and society go through drastic transformations in the contemporary era, the usages and metaphorical meanings of the gourd have changed towards a new reality.

Inquire
Betye Saar

Betye Saar
Moon & Stars, 1986
Sequins hand-applied on cloth
19.25 x 15.5 in (48.9 x 39.4 cm)

Betye Saar (b.1926) is one of the most important artists of her generation, playing a seminal role in the development of Assemblage art. Since the 1960s, her work has reflected on African American identity, spirituality and the connectedness between different cultures. Created by Saar and fabricated in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, the bead and sequin works were first exhibited at “Betye Saar: Resurrection: Site Installations 1977 to 1987" at California State University, Fullerton, CA (February 6 - March 6, 1988).

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Robert Mapplethorpe

Robert Mapplethorpe
Lisa Lyon (PL #80), 1983
Gelatin silver print
20 x 16 in (50.8 x 40.6 cm)

In 1980 Robert Mapplethorpe met Lisa Lyon, the first World Women’s Body Building Champion. For the next few years they would collaborate several times creating various portraits and figure studies included both full and fragmented body images.

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Robert Mapplethorpe

Robert Mapplethorpe
Maybelle, 1982
Gelatin silver print
19.25 x 15.25 in (48.9 x 38.7 cm)

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